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Frequently Asked Questions


We observe at a variety of locations across the National Park including many listed on the National Park Authority's guide. Please be aware that being a Dark Sky Reserve, Exmoor is actually dark! So please take care.

We hold meetings at various pubs and other venues across the Park, partly because it makes travel easier for those living on the South side of the Park and partly because it's fun to visit different pubs and try their food :) Although we often meet in pubs, we are an astronomy society, not a drinking club! Many of our members don't consume alcohol and all the venus offer tea, coffee and soft drinks. If you are coming to one of our meetings and intend to have a drink, please ensure that you have a designated non-drinking driver to get you safely home.

Exmoor StarGazers encompasses a wide range of astronomical interests from simple naked eye appreciation of the beautiful dark skies here to observational astronomy with large advanced telescopes. Some of our members like to watch meteors, satellites and the ISS with the naked eye or to simply learn the constellations whilst others are keen observers of the moon, planets and deep sky objects through telescopes. We also have members who specialise in astro-photography. We aim to be a friendly inclusive society that sees amateur astronomy as something that should be fun for everyone. :)

The current annual fee is:

  • • Membership: £5.00 (per member per year)
  • • Casual Attendance: Anyone can attend their first three meetings free. If you end up attending regularly we ask that you consider joining the club.

As a FAS registered astronomical society, we have modest costs associated with the meetings and events that we organise. The membership fees cover these costs. None of us receive any money personally from membership fees.

You can of course follow our Facebook page and Twitter page for free!

As a FAS registered astronomical society, we have modest costs associated with the meetings and events that we organise. The membership fees cover these costs. None of us receive any money personally from membership fees.

We're happy to help any member with any aspect of their hobby that we're able to, that's the whole point of the club! However if you do want assistance, we do ask that you please join the society first :)

If you post a question on our Facebook page, we'll do our best to answer it. Or if you're a member, then you can also just ask at the next meeting.

Yes you can. We announce observing meets on our Facebook page though these are of course subject to the British weather! If you're observing on Exmoor with us or alone, please be aware that Dark Sky Reserves are, well, dark! So bring torches and be careful.

Exmoor is one of the most scenic and lovely parts of England - guess that's why they made it into a National Park :) The National Park Authority website lists lots of things to see and do as well as great places to stay.

There are a number of dark sky reserves across the UK, Exmoor being the first. They're regions where the night sky is largely unspoilt by city lights. The sky here is black - not dirty orange or grey, and you'll be amazed how many more stars you can see than in the city. Dark skies are not just important to astronomers though. With the increasing number of bright lights scattered across the country many people are no longer able to experience one of nature's most impressive spectacles and the lives of Britain's native animals are also impacted by light pollution. Just as we have National parks to preserve what's left of Britain's natural beauty, it makes sense that those areas still unspoilt by light pollution should also have their skies protected. If we don't do this, future generations will never know how beautiful a starry sky is.